Assessments

What is the importance of facility assessments and how do they influence the development of the Facilities Master Plan?  There are several reasons to complete facility assessments during the master planning process.  Some of these reasons are:

  1. Facility assessments provide a clear snapshot of the condition of our current facilities.  Even though our facilities appear to be in good repair, some of them are more than 50 years old and the needs are not always readily apparent to the bystander.
  2. Facility assessments allow us to develop a maintenance cost schedule for the next 20 years.  We need to plan for the cost of replacing roofs, repainting, changing light fixtures or utilities.  An interesting fact is that the maintenance and operation of a facility, over a 50-year life span, often accounts for 80% of the cost of that facility.
  3. Perhaps the maintenance schedule is calling for the replacement of a building's roof and electrical system.  The master plan for the campus shows that this building is slated for demolition within the next five years.  At this point it would not be prudent to follow the maintenance schedule but rather forgo the roofing and electrical replacement.

The assessments are categorized in terms of immediate, short-term, mid-term, and long-term needs. The resulting costs associated with each of these categories are assembled into an interactive table to help our community understand the cost of maintaining our current facilities in the absence of a program to modernize, replace or remove aging buildings.

These repair items help to establish timelines for projects while project costs are developed. The sums of the expected costs are then weighed against the replacement value of each school to determine the Replacement Cost Index (RCI). This value is important when considering whether a facility should be improved or replaced.

Please take the time to review the Facility Condition Assessment for each of our campuses.  

Categories

The assessment process involved a team of trained field assessors visiting every site within the District to review, photograph, and note physical condition deficiencies related to predetermined major review categories.

Category Icon Description
Site Utilities Site Utilities Includes underground utilities, such as domestic water, sanitary waste, storm water, natural gas and electrical service, that are located beyond building enclosures.
Site Improvements Site Improvements Includes paving, grading, parking, fields, bleachers, swimming pools, landscaping and irrigation.
Architecture & Structure Architecture and Structure Includes exterior walls and finishes, roofs and drainage, and doors and windows.
Building Systems Building Systems Includes systems that are located within or attached to building enclosures, including electrical power, lighting, data/signal, fire alarm, phone, clock, public address, equipment, ductwork and controls, plumbing and fire sprinklers.
Interior Finishes Interior Finishes Includes interior wall, floor and ceiling finishes, as well as interior doors and windows.
Furnishings, Fixtures & Equipment Furnishings, Fixtures and Equipment Includes casework, marker boards, screens, projectors, stage/theater accessories, shelving bleachers, kitchen equipment and other accessory items.
Other Structures & Improvements Other Structures and Improvements Includes site fencing and signage, accessibility and code compliance, life-safety components, temporary facilities and portables, and general infrastructure.

Assessment Reports

Maintenance Costs

Anticipated costs associated with maintaining and repairing the existing school facilities.

In addition to these categories, the Immediate Repairs and Replacement Reserves costs can be combined as a Capital Needs Total budget (short-term costs from Year 0 through Year 10, plus AB300 Seismic Repairs where applicable); and the Capital Needs and Long-Term Items costs can be combined as a Deficiency Repair Total budget (long-term costs from Year 0 through Year 19, plus AB300 Seismic Repairs where applicable). The Capital Needs Total is useful for considering near-term costs related to a given site. In contrast, the Deficiency Repair Total is more useful for a long-term forecast of costs if no new work is done.

Replacement Cost Index

FCI versus RCI

Facilities assessments are categorized in terms of immediate, short-term, mid-term, and long-term needs. These maintenance and repair items help to establish timelines for projects while project costs are developed. In the Facilities Assessment Reports, the immediate and 10-year costs are divided by the Current Replacement Value (CRV)—currently $235.00 per square foot of building area—to establish the Current Facility Condition Index (FCI) and 10-Year FCI, respectively, as percentage values. The lower the FCI, the better assumed condition of the facility, with 0.0% FCI equating to perfect condition.

Facility Condition Index (FCI) Replacement Cost Index (RCI) Current: (Seismic + Immediate Repairs) ÷ CRV 10-Year: Capital Needs Total ÷ CRV (CRV + Long-Term Items) ÷ Deficiency Repair Total

In contrast, the Replacement Cost Index (RCI) looks at the ratio of CRV to long-term maintenance and repair costs. The sums of the expected costs over the next two decades are weighed against the CRV of each school plus maintenance costs for Long-Term Items (11 to 19 years) to determine the RCI. (Long-term maintenance costs are generally the same regardless of building age, so they are included on both sides of this ratio.)

RCI is important when considering whether or not a facility should be improved or replaced. An RCI value less than 1.0 means the cost to replace the existing facilities on a site is less than the cost to maintain those buildings. However, a low RCI does not necessarily mean the facilities on a site will be replaced, just as a high RCI does not necessarily mean the facilities on a site will be maintained. Rather, RCI seeks to establish an approximation of the relative benefits of either action.